Is Botox really worth it? Maybe. But maybe not. Here are the factors to weigh when making this decision for your skin. Your conclusions may change over the years. Here is why.

Botox is a poison that paralyzes a muscle temporarily, making it impossible for it to move. The main skin Botox is used for is the skin of our forehead and between our eyes. The wrinkles here are caused by muscle flexing and clenching. Botox exacts the muscle and relaxes it completely. So, initially after you get it, many people do see a reduction in these lines. 

On the other hand, soft line wrinkles are caused by topical dehydration and collagen loss and are not affected by Botox. Dehydration wrinkles can be plumped up considerably with a good skincare routine. Only SPF will slow the loss of collagen in our skin that provides bounce and volume.  

Another thing that affects overall skin volume is muscle tone and lift, which can only be achieved by face yoga and the regular use of a microcurrent device.

The Problem With Botox

While it may create initial, temporary improvements, that’s not the full story. Botox will cause muscle atrophy over time — muscles that are weak and droopy. In addition, the ongoing piercing of skin can break capillaries and cause unnecessary swelling and inflammation, which is a major component of accelerated aging. Too often, people reach for Botox as the main dish for their skin health, but this is slow skin suicide. You always need more and more over time. 

Botox is a one-trick pony. It paralyzes muscle and has a deteriorating effect long term. A comatose muscle that does not move is not healthy. Botox just creates a Band-Aid illusion of fewer wrinkles (or fewer facial expressions), but it’s superficial. Botox does not contribute to healthy skin. 

Many professional skin injectors will claim that it prevents wrinkles. But so does SPF, hydration, dermal nutrients, microcurrents, and face yoga without the risks and negative side effects. Botox fails to address the real markers for skin health, like overall skin glow for starters. Not to mention crucial skin texture and volume levels.

Skin that is resourced with topical dermal nutrients — skin that is making fresh, new skin cells daily — enjoys hydration and has a naturally smooth texture. These things contribute to our “skin health bank” and really pay out. Let’s just be honest and admit that Botox is a withdrawal from that “skin health bank.” 

However, once we have established a high health baseline, the negative effects can be minimized by garnishing wisely with Botox (if you must). Reaching from this place, Botox makes more sense, as less will be needed and it will be used less often to achieve a more natural result.

But as for me right now, I want my natural wrinkles to glow and my face to be expressive. I am learning to relax, not just my forehead but also my whole face and body. I am retraining my muscles to be lifted and strong, not asleep and wasting away.

Plus, I’m still waiting to hear one good reason why we should be numbing our energetic third eye with poison.

At some point, I’m only 49, I may decide to use a bit of Botox. But I will be doing it with my eyes open and minimally to not undermine my glow, texture, and the health of my skin.

If you are finding yourself fixating on Botox, I invite you to expand your beauty tricks to include these luscious and incredible services:

  • face sculpting massage
  • lymphatic massage
  • microcurrent
  • acupuncture

Keep learning about what the new paradigm shift means for your skin…practically.
Harm to heal is OUT and Nourish to Heal is IN.
Real healing is a beautiful process.
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